“The American public…just like your teenage kids, aren’t acting in a way that they should act,” Dr. Chu said. “The American public has to really understand in their core how important this issue is.”

[snip]

The administration aims to teach them—literally. The Environmental Protection Agency is focusing on real children. Partnering with the Parent Teacher Organization, the agency earlier this month launched a cross-country tour of 6,000 schools to teach students about climate change and energy efficiency.

“We’re showing people across the country how energy efficiency can be part of what they do every day,” said EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson. “Confronting climate change, saving money on our utility bills, and reducing our use of heavily-polluting energy can be as easy as making a few small changes.[sometimes small changes can make a big difference but to drastically reduce consumption will require drastic changes.]

[snip]

“I don’t think so…maybe I’m optimistic, but there’s very little debate” that a new green energy economy will bring economic prosperity, Mr. Chu told reporters. [He is sorely mistaken.]

Don’t look now, but there’s actually quite a lot of debate as to the economic merits of the new green-energy economy. Whether that will spell a healthcare-style revolt against the energy and climate bill stewing in the Senate is another question.

An update: Energy Department spokesman Dan Leistikow added: “Secretary Chu was not comparing the public to teenagers. [Yes, he was] He was saying that we need to educate teenagers about ways to save energy. [That’s not what he said.] He also recognized the need to educate the broader public about how important clean energy industries are to our competitive position in the global economy. [Propaganda is not the same as education.] He believes public officials do have an obligation to make their case to the American people on major legislation, and that’s what he’s doing.”

via Steven Chu: Americans Are Like ‘Teenage Kids’ When It Comes to Energy – Environmental Capital – WSJ.

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